Krishna stealing the clothes of Gopis

 

Krishna Vastraapaharan Kanchipuram

Krishna stealing clothes – Kanchipuram

 

The story of Krishna stealing the clothes of gopis is an interesting and a recurring theme in many temple sculptures. I have already posted a couple of blogs on these with photoes from different locations.

Vastraaharan: Krishna and Gopis

Krishna at it again

The two pictures in this post are from Kanchipuram but from different sources. The one above is from a mandapam in front of the West entrance to Sri Varadaraja Perumal temple.

The one below is a mural from a private house near the Varadraja Perumal temple. It belongs to one of the descendants of Prativadi Bhayamkaram Annangaracharya. The paintings were done around 1930 and are need of restoration. The helpful owners opened up the door and showed us around all the paintings.

90- year old Wall painting Vastrapaharan

90- year old Wall painting of Vastraharan Lila

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More Stone Windows

Many of my readers like the theme Stone Windows. At their prompt, I went through my archives and found one more photograph., a stone window from the Dharmeswarar Siva temple from Manimangalam (near Tambaram) taken about 11 years ago.

A recent visit to the Thirupparuthikundram Jain Temple in Kanchipuram added another carved stone window.

A stone window, Dharmeswar Temple, Manimanagalam

A stone window, Dharmeswar Temple, Manimanagalam

Manimanagalam is about 10 Kms from Tambaram on the Mudichur Padappai route. This was the theatre of the Pallava- Chalukya war of 7th C CE. The temple is believed to have been built by the Chozhas.

Here is one from the Thiuruparuthikundram Jain Temple from Jina Kanchi, Kanchipuram. this temple resembles a Hindu temple in architecture but the murals and idols are definitely Jain.

A carved knotted stone window from Jain temple at Thiruparuthikundram, Jin Kanchi

A carved knotted and braided stone window from Jain temple at Thiruparuthikundram, Jina Kanchi

Mystery Blogger Award

It is always wonderful to be acknowledged and appreciated. For the power of appreciation creates positive intentions and further channelizes creativity to flow even more meaningfully for a larger purpose.
The reason is after the first wave of elation over having received an award nomination you start realizing the responsibility of every word you are putting out there and how it can actually carry the power to transform thoughts if you want it to! And that’s truly incredible!
I would like to especially thank Savvy Raj for nominating me for this award.
Truly grateful to receive this nomination from her.

Do check out the blog https://savvyraj.com/ as she shares her engaging and empowering posts on styling, beauty amongst other interesting things.

What is a Mystery Blogger Award?

The creator of this award, Okoto Enigma, says “It’s an award for amazing bloggers with ingenious posts. Their blog not only captivates; it inspires and motivates. They are one of the best out there, and they deserve every recognition they get. This award is also for bloggers who find fun and inspiration in blogging, and they do it with so much love and passion.

The Rules

Here are the rules for the award which I have to mention:

Put the award logo/image on your blog.

List the rules.

Thank whoever nominated you and provide a link to their blog.

Tell your readers 3 things about yourself.

Answer the questions you were asked.

Nominate 10 – 20 people & notify.

Ask your nominees any 5 questions of your choice; with one weird or funny question (specify).

3 things about myself:

I am a senior citizen interested in Photography, heritage and travel.

I was a practicing senior management professional with 35 years in Industry and 10 years in academics.

Though a veteran, I consider myself a learner.

Here are brief answers to questions posed to me.

1: What does your perfect day look like?

Spending with friends and family.

2: If you had only one match and entered a Cold and Dark room, and there was an oil heater, an oil lamp and a candle, which would you light first?

The match, of course!

3: Can you adapt smoothly to changing realities and if so what is your biggest strength?Yes, I can. I take things as they are and see how I can make the best out of it rather than criticising.

4: Are you someone who works well on a team, or prefer to work on your own?

I think I work well in a team.

5: What ridiculously fun thing has someone tricked you into doing or believing?

In school (5th grade?)I was tricked by friends into breaking my own slate. Still remember and laugh about this 60 year old episode. 

I would like to thank everyone who is reading, following and visiting my blog.

Cheers,

 

Now I would like to nominate the following excellent blogs for this Mystery Blogger Award.

https://streetsofnuremberg.com/

https://anandkumarrs.com/

https://musingsfrommadampatti.wordpress.com/

https://golisodastore.com/index.php?route=simple_blog/article [what individuals like us can do for a sustainable world]

https://tcrcindia.com/ [nostalgia of south Indian movies]

https://madrasnallamadrasblog.wordpress.com/ [a daily photoblog on Chennai by the same author]

https://irevuo.com/

https://drvsridharsphotography.wordpress.com/

https://jaipurthrumylens.com/

https://shilpaagarg.com/

https://sunithkollara.com/

https://90rollsroyces.com/

https://superheroes009.wordpress.com/

Here are some questions for you.

  1. What is your idea of a happy day well spent?
  2. What you want to be remembered for after your time?
  3. Why do you blog?
  4. Which do you think is the most useful tool for a blogger?
  5. How important are images/photographs on your blog?

 

 

 

Stone Windows

As we are approaching the New Year, we may like to look through the window to see what to expect in 2018. Similarly, we may also look through the window to see our past events and experiences. So, I thought, the theme of this post could be ‘Windows from various monuments’.

stone window Kailasanathar temple Kanchipuram

stone window Kailasanathar temple Kanchipuram

Kailasanatha temple built in 7 C.CE by Rajasimha Pallava is perhaps the oldest temple in Kanchi.

An ornate stone window in Jwarahareswara temple, Kanchipuram

An ornate stone window in Jwarahareswara temple, Kanchipuram

 

Another window at Jvara hareswara temple, Kanchi

Another window at Jvara hareswara temple, Kanchi

The Jura hareswara temple at Kanchipuram is a Chola temple of the 10th C.CE. It is a comparitively small temple. Though situated on the main road in the city, one may miss this unless you are looking out for it.

carved window in Mukteswar temple, Bhubaneswar

carved window in Mukteswar temple, Bhubaneswar

The 10th Century Mukteswar temple in Bhubaneswar is one of the temples which started a new trend in Kalinga temple architecture.

The carved window viewed from the opposite side.

The view from through the opposite window.

Parasurameswara temple, Bhubaneswar, Odisha

Parasurameswara temple, Bhubaneswar Odisha

Parasurameswara temple, Bhubaneswar Odisha

Built in the 7th century, Parasurameswara temple is one of the oldest surviving temples in Bhubaneswar, Odisha. Note this artistic window where the louvres are designed around the dancers.

Another window from the same temple is below.

Parasurameswara temple, Bhubaneswar,Odisha

A carved stone window from Rajarani Temple, Bhubaneswar,

A carved stone window from Rajarani Temple, Bhubaneswar,

The 11th Century Rajarani temple in Bhubaneswar is noted for some exquisite carvings.

 

Aihole temple

Temple window in Aihole, Karnataka

 

[Watch this space. I shall be updating with more images]

Mathangeswara – Another little known Pallava temple

After seeing the Vaikunda Perumal Temple, we wanted to see the Mathangeeswarar temple, which according to Google Maps was nearby. However, no one could guide us properly. We ended up at the State Museum (small, but enthusiastic staff) and having an early lunch. After lunch, we decided to have one last try. We parked the car and started walking on the busy Hospital Road. All of a sudden, between two shops, we saw the familiar blue and rusty ASI board informing about all kinds of offences and fines.

Entrance of Mathangeeswarar temple, Kanchiouram

Entrance to Mathangeeswarar temple, Kanchipuram from Hospital Road

Going through the short passage we were pleasantly surprised to see a quadrangle with a small but imposing temple.

First sight of Mathankeshwarar temple, Kanchipuram

The Mathangeeswarar (or Mathangeswarar) temple is built on a high platform. The peaceful ambiance in the midst of the bustle of the bazaar is truly remarkable. There were a handful of young men reading and preparing notes. When we enquired they informed us that they are preparing for the state competitive examinations. To our query whether there is any spiritual significance for choosing this place to study, they said that it is only the peaceful ambiance which attracted them.  To our amusement, we found a polite request on the Mukha Mandapam not to sit on it for studying.

Mathangeeswarar temple, Kanchipuram

The style of architecture as highlighted by the lion pillars is definitely Pallava. The pillar details (ornate brackets, palagai & kumbha) indicate 8th century Pallava style.  The sanctum was closed when we were there but we understand that the main deity is Lord Shiva.

Pillar details at Mathangeeswarar temple, Kanchipuram

Pillar details at Mathangeswarar temple, Kanchipuram

The mukhamandapam has six panels. Two are the Dwarapalakas.  The others are 1) Gaja Samharamurthy 2) Ravananugrah Murthy [click here for the background story,  my blog on Ravana and Mount Kailash]  3) Urdhva Tandava Murthy & 4) Gangadhara.

Dwarapalaka at Mathankeswarar temple, Kanchipuram

Dwarapalaka at Mathankeswarar temple, Kanchipuram

Gajasamhara Murthy panel at Mathangeeswarar temple, Kanchipuram

Gajasamhara Murthy panel at Mathangeeswarar temple, Kanchipuram

Ravananugraha Murthy - a panel in Mathangeeswarar temple, Kanchipuram

Ravananugraha Murthy – a panel in Mathangeeswarar temple, Kanchipuram

Urdhva tandava Murthy a panel in Mathangeeswarar temple, Kanchipuram

Urdhva tandava Murthy a panel in Mathangeeswarar temple, Kanchipuram

Gangadharan at Matangeeswarar temple, Kanchipuram

Gangadharan at Matangeeswarar temple, Kanchipuram

The figures on the outside walls are highly eroded.

Mathangeeswarar temple, Kanchipuram

Outside view Mathangeeswarar temple, Kanchipuram

There is Nandi with a broken face on a pedestal under a peepul tree but there is no Nandi mandapam.

Mathangeeswarar temple, Kanchipuram

Another heritage monument neglected by the authorities and the public.

Jwara hareswara Temple, Kanchipuram

 

Jwarahareswarar temple Kanchi

Jwarahareswarar temple Kanchi

This small but important temple is located right on the main road leading from Ekambareswarar temple. Though it is centrally located it is easy to miss this unless one looks out for this as the facade is simple. Once you enter you will be struck by the beauty of the structure and the serenity of the surroundings.

This is a Chola period temple and is currently maintained by the ASI.

 

Ashta dikpaalas of Raja Rani Temple Bhubaneswar

The Rajarani temple (11th -12th C.C.E) of Bhubaneswar is one of the Kalinga temples well known for exquisite sculptures.

Like many other temples, this temple too has representation of the ashta dikpalas

Ashtadikpalas are the guardians of the 8 directions in Hinduism.

I have captured in my camera  5 or 6 of the dikpalas depicted in Rajarani temple during a recent visit. I missed the others due to the paucity of time and due to my failure to do some homework. (Or maybe I was overwhelmed by the beauty and grace of the sculpted female figures!)

Lord Yama with his Danda and noose on a buffalo

Lord Yama with his Danda and noose on a buffalo on the South

The four cardinal directions E, W, N, & S are ruled by Indra, Varuna, Kubera & Yama respectively. The ordinal (Intermediate) directions SE, SW, NE, & NW are guarded by Agni, Nirurti, Isana & Vayu respectively.

Varuna, Lord of the West, water and rain with a noose and crocodile

Varuna, Lord of the West, water, and rain with a noose and crocodile

Vayu rule the North West with an Ankush [prod]

Vayu rules the North West with an Ankush [prod]

Agni on a ram SE (the bearded figure on the bottom right)

Agni on a ram SE (the bearded figure on the bottom right)

Kubera, the Lord of wealth guards the North

Kubera, the Lord of wealth guards the North

Nirrti on the South West?

Nirrti on the South West?

Sometimes, these 8  are supplemented by 2 more directions – Urdhwa (Zenith) and Adho (Nadir) assigned to Brahma and Vishnu.

This concept of Dikpalas are applied in Vaastu Shastra, in temple and house architecture and also in town planning and layout.

Similar concepts also appear in Chinese and Buddhist philosophies. Not surprisingly it is also evident in countries like, Java, Bali, Cambodia etc which have Hindu influences.